The “go home” vans haven’t been banned

Provided that it corrects the misleading claim “106 arrests last week in your area”, the government is free to continue to use the “go home” slogan.

No policy attracted greater condemnation at the Labour and Lib Dem conferences than the Home Office’s “go home” vans, so today’s ruling by the Advertising Standards Authority is likely to be studied closely in Westminster.

Most of the media is reporting that the vans, which told illegal immigrants to “go home or face arrest” (a slogan that Yvette Cooper rightly warned was “reminiscent of the 1970s National Front”), have been banned by the ASA, but this seemingly favourable outcome isn’t supported by the facts.

The watchdog ruled that the line “106 arrests last week in your area” was “misleading” since the data on which it was based related to north London, rather than the areas in which the poster was displayed (Barking and Dagenham, Redbridge, Barnet, Brent, Ealing and Hounslow), but, significantly, it cleared the government of using “offensive” and “irresponsible” material that was likely to “incite or exacerbate racial hatred and tensions in multicultural communities”.

While acknowledging that the phrase “go home” was “reminiscent of slogans used in the past to attack immigrants to the UK”, the ASA said that the vans were “unlikely to cause serious or widespread offence or distress.” In addition, while “noting that many of those areas had multicultural, ethnically diverse populations”, it argued that the poster was “clearly addressed to illegal immigrants rather than to non-naturalised immigrants who were in the UK legally or to UK citizens, and it would be understood by those who saw it as communicating a message in relation to their immigration status, not their race or ethnicity.” As a result, it concluded that the vans were “unlikely to incite or exacerbate racial hatred and tensions in multicultural communities, and that it was not irresponsible and did not contain anything which was likely to condone or encourage violence or anti-social behaviour.”

Read full report here 

Read the full ASA statement here

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